Spring is the perfect time for dividing and re-potting perennials. I have two gardens I am removing and several new gardens I am adding. So I need more plants and different varieties.

Since the weather is still unstable (It’s actually nicer than normal, but I am a zone 5 so it’s a cool climate) I am just digging up one of the perennial gardens, diving the plants and re-potting them. They will be re-potted and stored in a mini greenhouse until the flea market, which is in 2 weeks.

Some of the plants will be used for the new gardens. These would be Hostas, Daisies, Black Eyed Susan’s, Rock Cress, Red Sedum, Bee Balm and several other ground covers.

There are several perennial varieties I planted that I did not like and they are heading to a flea market to be sold for more money for new plants. So in all I have 11 varieties that will be repotted and put up for sale in the next few weeks.

I have saved plastic pots from other years and picked up additional pots at an auction. Today I washed them in hot water and dish soap and let them dry. Then I rewashed them in soapy bleach water to kill any disease. I will let them dry naturally and then use them for my new perennial divided plant. The plants will have two weeks to get over transplant shock and look good.

I use my own mix of garden soil, compost and potting soil for the repotted perennials. I use each soil in equal parts.

I will make sure the perennial plants are marked well and have growing instructions with. I have found additional growing information helps the plants sell faster and I also sell more to each customer.

At this time I have over 500 plants to trade and will have more in a few weeks. These plants sell for $2 to $3 dollars each.

The money from these plants will be spent at a local perennial farm that charges $2 a scoop for perennial plants. I can usually divide each scoop I buy into 4 to 8 plants, depending on the plant type. I keep half of the plants and sell half so that I can continue to add to my plant varieties.

This year I am looking for more ground covers and bulbs.

So if you looking for new plant varieties try dividing your perennials and selling or trading for plants you don’t have. You may also have a nursery or plant garden nearby that offers reasonable priced plants that can be divided.

Tips for trading plants

  • Plant in nice pots and give them a chance to adjust to the pot
  • Mark the variety and offer growing instructions
  • Be open to trading for plants
  • Ask friends and neighbors if they might want to trade plants
  • Look for specials at garden centers.
  • You may want to buy plants with a friend and trade half of the plants.

Spring is the perfect time for replanting, dividing and purchasing new plants. If they are planted and can adjust to their new home before the days become hot the plants will grow better and healthier in their first year.